What to do when you meet a sighted person–from Vision Aware

What To Do when You Meet a Sighted Person

People who use their eyes to acquire information about the world are called sighted people or “people who are sighted.” Legal “sight” means any visual acuity greater than 20/200 in the better eye without correction or an angle of vision wider than 20 degrees. Sighted people enjoy rich, full, lives, as they work, play, and raise families. They run businesses, hold public offices, and teach your children.

Sighted people cannot function well in low lighting conditions and are usually helpless in total darkness. Their homes are usually brightly lit at great expense, as are businesses that cater to the sighted consumer.

How Can I Best Communicate with Sighted People?

Sighted people are accustomed to viewing the world in visual terms. This means that in many situations, they will not be able to communicate orally and may resort to pointing or other gesturing. They may also use subtle facial expressions to convey feelings in social situations. Calmly alert the sighted person to his or her surroundings by speaking slowly, in a normal tone of voice. There is no need to raise your voice when addressing a sighted person.

How Do Sighted People Get Around?

People who are sighted may walk or ride public transportation, but most choose to travel long distances by operating their own motor vehicles, usually one passenger to a car. They have gone through many hours of extensive training to learn the rules of the road in order to further their independence. Once that road to freedom has been mastered, sighted people earn a legal classification and a driver’s license, which allows them to operate a private vehicle relatively safely and independently.

How Can I Assist a Sighted Person?

At times, sighted people may need help finding things, especially when operating a motor vehicle. Your advance knowledge of routes and landmarks, particularly bumps in the road, turns, and traffic lights, will assist the “driver” in finding the way quickly and easily. Your knowledge of building layouts can also assist the sighted person in navigating complex shopping malls and offices. Sighted people tend to be very proud and will not ask directly for assistance. Be gentle, yet firm.

How Do Sighted People Read?

Sighted people read via a system called “print.” Print is a series of images drawn in a two-dimensional plane. Because the person who is sighted relies exclusively on visual information, his or her attention span tends to fade quickly when reading long texts. People who are sighted generally have a poorly developed sense of touch. Braille is completely foreign to the sighted person and he or she will take longer to learn the code and be severely limited by his or her existing visual senses.

How Do Sighted People Use Computers?

Computer information is presented to sighted people in a “Graphical User Interface” or GUI. Sighted people often suffer from hand-eye coordination problems. To accommodate this difficulty, people who are sighted use a “mouse,” a handy device that slides along the desk top to save confusing keystrokes. With one button, the sighted person can move around his or her computer screen quickly and easily.

People who are sighted are not accustomed to synthetic speech and may have great difficulty understanding even the clearest synthesizer. Be patient and be prepared to explain many times how your computer equipment works.

How Can I Support a Sighted Person?

People who are sighted do not want your charity. They want to live, work and play alongside you on an equal basis. The best thing you can do to support sighted people in your community is to open yourself to their world. These citizens are vital contributing members of the community, real people with thoughts and feelings, hopes and dreams, and a story to tell. Take a sighted person to lunch today!

 

The Housing Tale Continues

One of the biggest transitions for our adult child with disabilities was the transition to her own apartment. We signed up for waiting list openings to get the Section 8 voucher. One information source said that the waiting list hadn’t been open in ten years, and might not open for a while.

And, when they are open, we discovered that, in places like very-populated Ingham County, when the list opens, it may be for only a week or two. Low income housing is so sparse that the waiting lists are full.

lilacs

We applied to a couple of places. One was Alison House in Lansing. Another was an apartment complex in Mason. Our daughter got an apartment very quickly, probably because the waiting list is arranged with lowest income individuals at the top.

She doesn’t have the lowest rent, because she doesn’t have the voucher for people with disabilities, but she’s paying about what she paid us when she lived in our rental house.

I stayed with her the first two nights, so that she could adjust to things. She is blind and has autism, with sensory hypersensitivity. But it’s REALLY QUIET there, and she wasn’t bothered at all.

old townhousesSo I’d recommend that you find the places in your town that have rents scaled by income, fill out their (probably lengthy) application, and also keep an eye on the waiting list. If you live in Reed City or Baldwin, the list sits open all the time. If you live in a highly populated area, it may open very infrequently.

We get notices from Affordablehousing.com. I am not sure it’s the best place, but it’s the best I have found to monitor open waiting lists. More housing and independent living news to come…

 

 

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Educating youth with mental health, emotional, or behavioral concerns: a new publication from @PACER

Helpful new publication now available

Educating Your Child with Mental Health, Emotional, or Behavioral Disorders: Information for Parents is now available upon request. This concise guide will help parents of children with mental health, emotional, or behavioral disorders to participate effectively in special education planning. Each chapter includes a set of questions to consider when thinking about developing the Individualized Education Program (IEP), including school discipline policies, placement options, and behavioral and emotional support needs. One copy is free to Minnesota parents of children or youth with disabilities. For professionals it is $5 | 10+ copies, $4 each |Get it from PACER Center at this link: PHP-a21black young woman looking forward

Paths to Employment Webinar

Check out another great webinar from the PACER Center…and while you’re at it, how about forwarding this to someone else?

Paths to Employment: Exploring the Options

Date: Thursday, June 21, 2018
Time: 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM
A panel of representatives from Minnesota’s Special Education, Career and Technical Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, and WorkForce Center systems will share information to help youth with disabilities get started on a career path, ways the programs work together, and how youth can access these services. Information will primarily address options available to in-school youth, but some information about programs for out-of-school youth will also be presented.
Live:Web Streaming Availible

Try some online tools to explore careers

Free Career Test Online – CareerFitter.com

60 question free career test uncovers the scientific summary of your work personality. Generates a detailed full version option with lists of careers and jobs plus.colored pencil points

Mapping Your Future: Explore careers

Mapping Your Future is a nonprofit organization committed to helping students, families, and schools navigate the higher education and student loan processes through trusted career, college, and financial aid counseling and resources.

Explore Careers – Job Opportunities for College Graduates – BigFuture

A well-crafted résumé can help you land a job, an internship or a volunteer position. Learn what to include on a résumé and start working on yours. Start slide show. Major and Career Search. Major and Career Search. Wondering how can you pursue your interests in college and beyond? Search by keyword or browse by …

Explore Careers | GetMyFuture | CareerOneStop

Find a career that’s right for you! Taking the time to identify your interests and skills will help you be successful and happy in your work.

Home | explorehealthcareers.org

Student health careers information and interactive tools for exploring health career paths, and finding schooling and funding opportunities.

Indiana Career Explorer

A career planning system for all Hoosiers! Sign in to explore jobs in demand, assess your skills, and develop a plan to get the education and training you need to begin planning for your future today. Indiana Career Explorer will help you explore a world of career possibilities, make decisions about your future, and prepare …

Michigan Education & Career Pathfinder

Explore Career Options | CAMW – Capital Area Michigan Works!

employment tool kit.pdf – Autism Speaks

Jan 7, 2013 – Looking for a job can be a long process. It is important to focus on the positive steps to gaining employment such as networking and meeting new people, learning about your strengths, learning new skills and exploring careers. Choose a team to help you with your job search that includes the people that …

Vocational Assessment and Its Role in Career Planning | NCWD/Youth

http://www.ncwd-youth.info › Publications by Topic › Workforce Development

The use of aptitude assessment isolated from other vocational assessment information tends to screen out youth with significant disabilities. However, aptitude tests may be helpful when used as tools to identify customized job training, supports, or accommodations that may be needed by an individual to succeed in an …

QuickBook Of Transition Assessments – OCALI

assistance in finding and keeping a job, tools and supplies needed to reach goals, vocational training, post-secondary preparation, assistive technology, and more. ____ Social Security Administration. Manages two different disability programs – SSDI and SSI. Both programs provide a monthly income for people with …

Person Centered Assessment Tools :: Center for Development and …

cdd.unm.edu › CDD › Partners for Employment › Topics A to Z

My Star (ARCA); Positive Personal Profile; PATH (Planning Alternative Tomorrows with Hope); Person-Centered Assessment tool; Vocational Assessment Profiles … or discovery component, meaning that individuals with developmental disabilities experience community activities as a component of the assessment process.

Free Career Test Online – CareerFitter.com

60 question free career test uncovers the scientific summary of your work personality. Generates a detailed full version option with lists of careers and jobs plus.

Mechanical: working with tools and equipment. Communication: listening, speaking and working with others. Judgment: making clear, decisive decisions. Attention: focus on the problem at hand. Thinking: working with new ideas and creative thinking. Physical: strength, agility and dexterity. Senses: eyesight and hearing …

Join us on Thursday, April 19 for the LINCs meeting…one of the best things going on in Lansing for young adults with disabilities!

LINCS Meeting Notice
View this email in your browser
LINCS Educational Session for Families

THURSDAY, April 19, 2018
6:30 p.m.
Pilgrim Congregational Church
125 S. Pennsylvania Ave., Lansing, MI
FOCUS on:       DNCAP
Disability Network Capital Area

Knowing what resources are available in our community and knowing how to navigate them can be overwhelming. Disability Network Capital Area (DNCAP) assists with connecting individuals with disabilities and their families to community resources–by directly providing services and/or through linking to other service providers. DNCAP, formerly known as Capital Area Center for Independent Living, was established in 1976 and has a rich and long history with the Greater Lansing Area serving families in Clinton, Eaton, Ingham and Shiawassee counties.

We are pleased to welcome DNCAP’s Executive Director Mark Pierce and Resource Development Manager Diana Maddox to talk to us about this important community resource.  They will give us a bit of their history and cover the range of services and programming they provide at their center and throughout the community.

These monthly sessions are a great way to learn more about supporting loved ones who
are living with developmental disabilities and to
meet people with
similar interests.

Whether you are part  of Lansing Intentional Communities
now or are just looking for more information,
you are most welcome.


About
LINCS

Our mission is to
integrate adults with
autism and other
developmental
disabilities into
their communities
while maximizing
independence and
positive outcomes.

LINCS, and all individuals associated with LINCS, cannot
provide transportation, childcare or emergency services for attendees. 

Please note that attendees are fully responsible for their own safety and well-being.

What we’ve learned so far about finding an apartment for a young adult with disabilities

Every state has a housing development authority. In Michigan, it’s the Michigan State Housing Development Authority. Start with MSHDA here: webapp.mshda.cgi-bps.com/Default.aspx For help finding an apartment, start here: michiganhousinglocator.com/Portals/mshda/Default.aspx (but not sure this listing service show correct information about Spectran paratransit in Lansing.)

Word of mouth–It could take as long as 3 years to get to the top of the waiting list. When/if you do get to the top, you have to take what is offered anywhere in the county or else go to the bottom and wait again.

Housing Choice Vouchers (HCVs) are the most desirable subsidy because, as the name implies, you can choose to live anywhere (in theory). The government reimburses the landlord for what you cannot pay. You can find out more at MSHDA.

Lansing Housing Commission (lanshc.org; 517-487-6550) is another portal to some of the same opportunities. Do you own property? Would you like help to turn it into a low-rent opportunity? Lansing Housing Commission, or any local housing commission, is probably your best bet to speak to a human being rather that only view a website.

Affordable Housing Online has quite a bit of information about different kinds of subsidized housing, but I wondered if some spam I got was because of them. Two unsubscribes and the spam was over, so I think it’s worth spending time there and maybe signing up for their info. You can sign up for email alerts for the state you live in. These folks also have some “guides” that tell more about housing options, if you scroll to the bottom of the screen. (affordablehousingonline.com) You’ll be shocked by some info, such as “This county’s waiting list was last opened in March 2014, and it’s not known when the waiting list will be open again.” It’s clear there’s a housing shortage for people with disabilities who need reduced rent.

Intentional communities are a throwback to the 60s commune lifestyle, but designed so that families and friends can encircle and support individuals who need extra help to live independently. Check out these in Michigan: Lansing Intentional Communities (LINCS; http://linc2linc.org ), Intentional Communities of Washtenaw (intentcom.org), Saline Maple Oaks (www.salinemapleoaks.com)

A good basic question when exploring housing is this: How do you feel about having a roommate? This is a crucial piece of information when searching for housing.

Good luck and post your tips. Forward this to others who might want to get some help on the journey. You can email Lydia at lschuck51@edentransition.org.

 

Meeting Thursday 3/1 in Mason

We’ll be meeting for the Girls’ Social Group on March 1 and 15, and then every first and third Thursday through May. We meet at 1981 Eden Road in Mason. We meet from 6:30 to 8. Put a comment below if you want to ask questions.

Is there someone you’d think might like to know about our social opportunities for girls and young women with autism or other social issues? Send them the link to this webpage, and encourage them to join our list. Helpful resources only go as far as our mailing list members!

Next time: What we’re finding out about housing, summer opportunities for blind youth, and other useful thoughts about transition to adulthood.

Got Transition?

Have you visited GotTransition.org? Got Transition aims to improve transition from pediatric to adult health care through the use of new and innovative strategies for health professionals and youth and families.

For many young people with disabilities or other health care related issues, the transition to adult health care systems can be quite a challenge. Our daughter, at 25, just saw her behavioral pediatrician for the last time! She’d already successfully been managing her doctor visits for everything else, but it’s hard to part with the doctor who has walked through autism with us!

Our next group meeting for young women is on Thursday, February 15.