“Not Tommy”: Smart and Safe, Part 2

Read “Not Tommy”: Smart and Safe, Part 1

Katie was visiting Tommy at least once a day most days. Maggie and Katie’s dad worried a little, but didn’t want Katie to worry. After all, this was her first time having her own place away from her parents. Maggie and Jim, Katie’s dad, were also enjoying the time with Katie’s younger siblings. Everyone was breathing a little easier, having some space from each other.

One evening, Katie called, sounding upset. “Mom, he insulted me so much. I mean, he was trying to get me to stay in his apartment when I decided I better leave. He was kissing me and touching me on my bottom and on my breasts and saying silly things.”

“Who?” asked Maggie.

It was Tommy. He’d been drinking, and with his self-control impaired, he decided to try to take advantage of Katie’s somewhat diminished capacity to make decisions. But, when she tried to leave, he hugged her to make her stay. She was determined to leave, and he insulted her by trying to make her stay, Katie said later.

Maggie went over to Katie’s apartment and talked it all out. Maggie knew that whatever else had happened, Tommy had committed assault when he tried to keep her from leaving against her will.

“I even went back up there after I called you, Mom, just to yell at him and tell him he couldn’t do stuff like that and that he insulted me.”

By now, Katie had told her mom a lot of details, and Katie’s mom had called Katie’s dad to tell him the details. They all agreed that Maggie would stay over at Katie’s place, just in case. In the morning, Katie told her story to the management of the apartment complex, who called the police.

Katie was very open with the police officer, who was quite respectful to her. This surprised Maggie, because Katie is naive and seems younger than her 26 years. Still, the officer treated her like an adult. Maggie had a chance to thank him later.

The case was turned over to the prosecutor’s office, who decided not to press charges. Of course, Tommy had his own version of the events.

Grown-up kids have grown-up problems. No parent would wish this situation on a young adult child, but Maggie was reassured that Katie could manage herself in a tight situation, could recognize when it was time to get out, and could communicate clearly when asked to relate what happened. This was just about the best thing Maggie could ask for…no one can protect their kids from every problem, but all parents can help kids learn to speak up for themselves and take charge to leave a bad situation.

How can I explore a career if I can’t go to the place where people work?

Here’s a link to Exploring Careers Virtually, a presentation that is full of resources and connections for young adults with disabilities and their families. It came from Youth Career Connect, a project of the US Department of Labor. It covers the topics listed below:

  • How to connect students to the workplace virtually to learn about careers.
  • How to navigate the CareerOneStop, Get My Future portal (structure and uses).
  • Other platforms (free platforms; state-focused platforms; subscription sites)

What do you think? How can a young person explore a career like lab science, or office management, or welding, without going into the place where that job happens? Tell us about it.

 

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Low Income and Subsidized Housing

Here’s more good information on kinds of affordable housing. There’s a real shortage of housing for people with very low incomes. It helps to get more familiar with what is our there. Affordable Housing Online just started a “premium service” that has a fee, but I get lots of information without paying for the premium service.

More info on housing options

tribune building - Copy

“Not Tommy”: Smart and Safe, Part 1

Katie’s mom and dad were so proud of her. She’d gotten her own apartment, and was really happy about it. Of course, it’d only been a day or two since they finished moving her in. She was 24, and had collected a bunch of furniture over the past couple of years, so she was ready to make the big step of moving to her own place. Tommy and Rick, two other residents helped Katie and her dad carry in the furniture.

Katie’s favorite thing was to go out shopping to find the little toys that were her hobby and obsession. She was anxious and focused on getting to go shopping all the time. After just a day at the apartment complex, Katie, who had autism and tends to be too friendly, asked Tommy to take her to a nearby resale shop. Tommy took her to the shop and a nearby garden store, and then out to Wendy’s. Katie said later that she’d offered to pay for their lunches at Wendy’s, but Tommy insisted on buying.

Katie’s mom, Maggie, was a little surprised that Katie wasn’t home when she arrived at the apartment that afternoon. An older gent sitting outside the building said that Katie had gone off with Tommy for a while. They must be back, the gent said, because, “there’s Tommy’s truck. I imagine your daughter is up sitting with Tommy.”

Just a minute later, Katie came down from Tommy’s apartment, and he followed, carrying two plastic totes. Katie had told Tommy that she needed a couple of those totes for her toys and other things in the apartment. Katie’s dad wanted his totes back, the ones Katie had used to transport her things to the apartment.

Katie would sometimes feel like everyone was correcting her and scolding her. She tended to overreact when corrected by family members, so Maggie talked very gently with Katie after Tommy left to go back up to his place.

“Katie, how did that happen that you went out with Tommy? How did you know if it would be OK?”

And Katie replied, with her characteristic naivete, “I asked him to take me to the resale shop. When I got in his truck, I asked Tommy if he was the kind of person who might hurt me or try to make out with me. And he said no, he is not that kind of person and wouldn’t do that.”

“But Katie,” Maggie asked, “What if he were that kind of person and you asked that question, I mean, not Tommy, but someone else?”

Katie was a bit naïve, but she understood. She replied, “Well, I guess a person who wanted to hurt me might say the same thing Tommy said.”

“Not Tommy,” Maggie said, “But someone else. You’re right, a person who intended to hurt you might say the same thing, that he wasn’t going to hurt you. It’s hard to know when it’s the truth.”

Maggie didn’t want to keep Katie from meeting new people, and didn’t want Katie to get frightened of the mostly very kind people around her, including Tommy. “With someone else,” Maggie said, “not Tommy, of course, but with anyone else, you need to be very careful. And your dad and I want to have the phone numbers of your friends. And we want you to have your phone with you.”

Still, Maggie was a bit worried about Tommy. Although she said “not Tommy”, she was thinking, “maybe Tommy.”

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Stay tuned for the rest of the story in a few days…

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Photo by Mircea Iancu on Pexels.com

The Housing Tale Continues

One of the biggest transitions for our adult child with disabilities was the transition to her own apartment. We signed up for waiting list openings to get the Section 8 voucher. One information source said that the waiting list hadn’t been open in ten years, and might not open for a while.

And, when they are open, we discovered that, in places like very-populated Ingham County, when the list opens, it may be for only a week or two. Low income housing is so sparse that the waiting lists are full.

lilacs

We applied to a couple of places. One was Alison House in Lansing. Another was an apartment complex in Mason. Our daughter got an apartment very quickly, probably because the waiting list is arranged with lowest income individuals at the top.

She doesn’t have the lowest rent, because she doesn’t have the voucher for people with disabilities, but she’s paying about what she paid us when she lived in our rental house.

I stayed with her the first two nights, so that she could adjust to things. She is blind and has autism, with sensory hypersensitivity. But it’s REALLY QUIET there, and she wasn’t bothered at all.

old townhousesSo I’d recommend that you find the places in your town that have rents scaled by income, fill out their (probably lengthy) application, and also keep an eye on the waiting list. If you live in Reed City or Baldwin, the list sits open all the time. If you live in a highly populated area, it may open very infrequently.

We get notices from Affordablehousing.com. I am not sure it’s the best place, but it’s the best I have found to monitor open waiting lists. More housing and independent living news to come…

 

 

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Educating youth with mental health, emotional, or behavioral concerns: a new publication from @PACER

Helpful new publication now available

Educating Your Child with Mental Health, Emotional, or Behavioral Disorders: Information for Parents is now available upon request. This concise guide will help parents of children with mental health, emotional, or behavioral disorders to participate effectively in special education planning. Each chapter includes a set of questions to consider when thinking about developing the Individualized Education Program (IEP), including school discipline policies, placement options, and behavioral and emotional support needs. One copy is free to Minnesota parents of children or youth with disabilities. For professionals it is $5 | 10+ copies, $4 each |Get it from PACER Center at this link: PHP-a21black young woman looking forward

Paths to Employment Webinar

Check out another great webinar from the PACER Center…and while you’re at it, how about forwarding this to someone else?

Paths to Employment: Exploring the Options

Date: Thursday, June 21, 2018
Time: 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM
A panel of representatives from Minnesota’s Special Education, Career and Technical Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, and WorkForce Center systems will share information to help youth with disabilities get started on a career path, ways the programs work together, and how youth can access these services. Information will primarily address options available to in-school youth, but some information about programs for out-of-school youth will also be presented.
Live:Web Streaming Availible

Try some online tools to explore careers

Free Career Test Online – CareerFitter.com

60 question free career test uncovers the scientific summary of your work personality. Generates a detailed full version option with lists of careers and jobs plus.colored pencil points

Mapping Your Future: Explore careers

Mapping Your Future is a nonprofit organization committed to helping students, families, and schools navigate the higher education and student loan processes through trusted career, college, and financial aid counseling and resources.

Explore Careers – Job Opportunities for College Graduates – BigFuture

A well-crafted résumé can help you land a job, an internship or a volunteer position. Learn what to include on a résumé and start working on yours. Start slide show. Major and Career Search. Major and Career Search. Wondering how can you pursue your interests in college and beyond? Search by keyword or browse by …

Explore Careers | GetMyFuture | CareerOneStop

Find a career that’s right for you! Taking the time to identify your interests and skills will help you be successful and happy in your work.

Home | explorehealthcareers.org

Student health careers information and interactive tools for exploring health career paths, and finding schooling and funding opportunities.

Indiana Career Explorer

A career planning system for all Hoosiers! Sign in to explore jobs in demand, assess your skills, and develop a plan to get the education and training you need to begin planning for your future today. Indiana Career Explorer will help you explore a world of career possibilities, make decisions about your future, and prepare …

Michigan Education & Career Pathfinder

Explore Career Options | CAMW – Capital Area Michigan Works!

employment tool kit.pdf – Autism Speaks

Jan 7, 2013 – Looking for a job can be a long process. It is important to focus on the positive steps to gaining employment such as networking and meeting new people, learning about your strengths, learning new skills and exploring careers. Choose a team to help you with your job search that includes the people that …

Vocational Assessment and Its Role in Career Planning | NCWD/Youth

http://www.ncwd-youth.info › Publications by Topic › Workforce Development

The use of aptitude assessment isolated from other vocational assessment information tends to screen out youth with significant disabilities. However, aptitude tests may be helpful when used as tools to identify customized job training, supports, or accommodations that may be needed by an individual to succeed in an …

QuickBook Of Transition Assessments – OCALI

assistance in finding and keeping a job, tools and supplies needed to reach goals, vocational training, post-secondary preparation, assistive technology, and more. ____ Social Security Administration. Manages two different disability programs – SSDI and SSI. Both programs provide a monthly income for people with …

Person Centered Assessment Tools :: Center for Development and …

cdd.unm.edu › CDD › Partners for Employment › Topics A to Z

My Star (ARCA); Positive Personal Profile; PATH (Planning Alternative Tomorrows with Hope); Person-Centered Assessment tool; Vocational Assessment Profiles … or discovery component, meaning that individuals with developmental disabilities experience community activities as a component of the assessment process.

Free Career Test Online – CareerFitter.com

60 question free career test uncovers the scientific summary of your work personality. Generates a detailed full version option with lists of careers and jobs plus.

Mechanical: working with tools and equipment. Communication: listening, speaking and working with others. Judgment: making clear, decisive decisions. Attention: focus on the problem at hand. Thinking: working with new ideas and creative thinking. Physical: strength, agility and dexterity. Senses: eyesight and hearing …

Join us on Thursday, April 19 for the LINCs meeting…one of the best things going on in Lansing for young adults with disabilities!

LINCS Meeting Notice
View this email in your browser
LINCS Educational Session for Families

THURSDAY, April 19, 2018
6:30 p.m.
Pilgrim Congregational Church
125 S. Pennsylvania Ave., Lansing, MI
FOCUS on:       DNCAP
Disability Network Capital Area

Knowing what resources are available in our community and knowing how to navigate them can be overwhelming. Disability Network Capital Area (DNCAP) assists with connecting individuals with disabilities and their families to community resources–by directly providing services and/or through linking to other service providers. DNCAP, formerly known as Capital Area Center for Independent Living, was established in 1976 and has a rich and long history with the Greater Lansing Area serving families in Clinton, Eaton, Ingham and Shiawassee counties.

We are pleased to welcome DNCAP’s Executive Director Mark Pierce and Resource Development Manager Diana Maddox to talk to us about this important community resource.  They will give us a bit of their history and cover the range of services and programming they provide at their center and throughout the community.

These monthly sessions are a great way to learn more about supporting loved ones who
are living with developmental disabilities and to
meet people with
similar interests.

Whether you are part  of Lansing Intentional Communities
now or are just looking for more information,
you are most welcome.


About
LINCS

Our mission is to
integrate adults with
autism and other
developmental
disabilities into
their communities
while maximizing
independence and
positive outcomes.

LINCS, and all individuals associated with LINCS, cannot
provide transportation, childcare or emergency services for attendees. 

Please note that attendees are fully responsible for their own safety and well-being.

HOW I GOT STARTED AS AN ENTREPRENEUR — Anna Schuck

Anna Schuck June 2016

One of our participants has had a story published in the Michigan Family Connections Newsletter. You can read it below!

I’m going to tell you about how I got started as a retailer. It all started when I was about three years old. My mom had gotten some plastic animals for me. I played with those animals a lot, and since I’m blind, the animals helped me to understand what real animals looked like. And since I have autism, my collection of plastic animals has become my passion.
Now jump forward to the year 2015. At this time I was standing in a little toy store in Jackson Mi. I was looking at some plastic animals they had displayed there on the shelf. In previous years, I had seen these figures advertised at Michael’s, and other craft stores. Yet, as I stood there, looking at them then, I started thinking “I wonder where these toy store people get these figures from? I wonder if I could carry these things too?”
And so, my business began. I started selling and ordering in 2016, but for a while before my first order, I had to scrape together $100 in order to make my very first order. Now, my dream has always been to work in a storefront, but that will probably be delayed for a time, perhaps forever, because my autism gets in the way. But in spite of all this, my business has really been the best part of my life.


The Girls’ Social Group will meet on April 5 and 19, and May 3 and 17. Thursday evenings, 6:30 to 8 PM.