The Housing Tale Continues

One of the biggest transitions for our adult child with disabilities was the transition to her own apartment. We signed up for waiting list openings to get the Section 8 voucher. One information source said that the waiting list hadn’t been open in ten years, and might not open for a while.

And, when they are open, we discovered that, in places like very-populated Ingham County, when the list opens, it may be for only a week or two. Low income housing is so sparse that the waiting lists are full.

lilacs

We applied to a couple of places. One was Alison House in Lansing. Another was an apartment complex in Mason. Our daughter got an apartment very quickly, probably because the waiting list is arranged with lowest income individuals at the top.

She doesn’t have the lowest rent, because she doesn’t have the voucher for people with disabilities, but she’s paying about what she paid us when she lived in our rental house.

I stayed with her the first two nights, so that she could adjust to things. She is blind and has autism, with sensory hypersensitivity. But it’s REALLY QUIET there, and she wasn’t bothered at all.

old townhousesSo I’d recommend that you find the places in your town that have rents scaled by income, fill out their (probably lengthy) application, and also keep an eye on the waiting list. If you live in Reed City or Baldwin, the list sits open all the time. If you live in a highly populated area, it may open very infrequently.

We get notices from Affordablehousing.com. I am not sure it’s the best place, but it’s the best I have found to monitor open waiting lists. More housing and independent living news to come…

 

 

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Better preparation for community organizations to serve youth and families with autism, from Autism Speaks

This came straight from the website of Autism Speaks:

“Unfortunately, boys and girls with autism often face barriers to participating fully in youth community organizations. And so with help from respected experts in the field of autism and special education, experienced parents and caregivers, we have created Leading the Way: Autism-Friendly Youth Organizations, a guide for organizations to ensure that youth with autism have the same formative experiences through community programs that are available to their typical peers.

The purpose of this guide is to better prepare community organizations to serve youth and families with autism. The information will help organizations learn to integrate youth with autism into existing programs, communicate with parents, and train their staff.”

Click here to download Leading the Way: Autism-Friendly Youth Organizations Guide. You can also download individual sections at the links below:

Introduction
About Autism: What You Need to Know
Inclusion: Leading the Way in Access for Everyone
Getting Started: Leading the Way to an Autism-Friendly Inclusive Environment
People and Places: Creating an Environment for Success
Strategies for Success: Supporting Learning and Growth in Youth with Autism

And straight from Eden Transition Alliance: Reminder of opportunity this Saturday, 8/4

Parents of  kids who have IEPs are welcome to come to Biggby 6439 S. Cedar, Lansing, Michigan, 9 to 11 AM, to share successes and concerns before the new school year. Watch this space…we may do this again before Labor Day.

Sign up to get our posts, and follow Lydia on Twitter @Lydia_Schuck.

IEP Moms (and Dads) Sharing Time Aug 4

multicolored abacus photography

Photo by Skitterphoto on Pexels.com

Quick! Before school starts, build up your reserves of encouragement and strategies to support your child with disabilities. It doesn’t matter how old your children are…you have something to offer, and probably want to hear the concerns of other parents. You might be homeschooling or public schooling, with or without an IEP, but you have concerns about your child’s needs and achievement.

Come talk with other parents on Saturday, Aug. 4, anytime between 9 and 11 AM at Biggby, 6439 S. Cedar in Lansing, Michigan. This meeting will be facilitated by Lydia Schuck. No legal advice will be given, but we will have a copy of the special education laws and regulations to look at.

 

Educating youth with mental health, emotional, or behavioral concerns: a new publication from @PACER

Helpful new publication now available

Educating Your Child with Mental Health, Emotional, or Behavioral Disorders: Information for Parents is now available upon request. This concise guide will help parents of children with mental health, emotional, or behavioral disorders to participate effectively in special education planning. Each chapter includes a set of questions to consider when thinking about developing the Individualized Education Program (IEP), including school discipline policies, placement options, and behavioral and emotional support needs. One copy is free to Minnesota parents of children or youth with disabilities. For professionals it is $5 | 10+ copies, $4 each |Get it from PACER Center at this link: PHP-a21black young woman looking forward

10 ways to affect outcomes of youth with disabilities

Today we want to connect you to an excellent video from the Center on Transition Innovations at Virginia Commonwealth University. The video highlights 10 ways to affect outcomes of youth with disabilities. The video is captioned, so it is also easy to share with friends who have hearing loss or are Deaf or Deafblind. Pass it around, and visit other places on the center’s website, as well. And be sure to follow us to get the next post. There’s so much to learn about supporting young adults with disabilities in their transitions to adulthood.asian teen girl smiling

Paths to Employment Webinar

Check out another great webinar from the PACER Center…and while you’re at it, how about forwarding this to someone else?

Paths to Employment: Exploring the Options

Date: Thursday, June 21, 2018
Time: 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM
A panel of representatives from Minnesota’s Special Education, Career and Technical Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, and WorkForce Center systems will share information to help youth with disabilities get started on a career path, ways the programs work together, and how youth can access these services. Information will primarily address options available to in-school youth, but some information about programs for out-of-school youth will also be presented.
Live:Web Streaming Availible

Try some online tools to explore careers

Free Career Test Online – CareerFitter.com

60 question free career test uncovers the scientific summary of your work personality. Generates a detailed full version option with lists of careers and jobs plus.colored pencil points

Mapping Your Future: Explore careers

Mapping Your Future is a nonprofit organization committed to helping students, families, and schools navigate the higher education and student loan processes through trusted career, college, and financial aid counseling and resources.

Explore Careers – Job Opportunities for College Graduates – BigFuture

A well-crafted résumé can help you land a job, an internship or a volunteer position. Learn what to include on a résumé and start working on yours. Start slide show. Major and Career Search. Major and Career Search. Wondering how can you pursue your interests in college and beyond? Search by keyword or browse by …

Explore Careers | GetMyFuture | CareerOneStop

Find a career that’s right for you! Taking the time to identify your interests and skills will help you be successful and happy in your work.

Home | explorehealthcareers.org

Student health careers information and interactive tools for exploring health career paths, and finding schooling and funding opportunities.

Indiana Career Explorer

A career planning system for all Hoosiers! Sign in to explore jobs in demand, assess your skills, and develop a plan to get the education and training you need to begin planning for your future today. Indiana Career Explorer will help you explore a world of career possibilities, make decisions about your future, and prepare …

Michigan Education & Career Pathfinder

Explore Career Options | CAMW – Capital Area Michigan Works!

employment tool kit.pdf – Autism Speaks

Jan 7, 2013 – Looking for a job can be a long process. It is important to focus on the positive steps to gaining employment such as networking and meeting new people, learning about your strengths, learning new skills and exploring careers. Choose a team to help you with your job search that includes the people that …

Vocational Assessment and Its Role in Career Planning | NCWD/Youth

http://www.ncwd-youth.info › Publications by Topic › Workforce Development

The use of aptitude assessment isolated from other vocational assessment information tends to screen out youth with significant disabilities. However, aptitude tests may be helpful when used as tools to identify customized job training, supports, or accommodations that may be needed by an individual to succeed in an …

QuickBook Of Transition Assessments – OCALI

assistance in finding and keeping a job, tools and supplies needed to reach goals, vocational training, post-secondary preparation, assistive technology, and more. ____ Social Security Administration. Manages two different disability programs – SSDI and SSI. Both programs provide a monthly income for people with …

Person Centered Assessment Tools :: Center for Development and …

cdd.unm.edu › CDD › Partners for Employment › Topics A to Z

My Star (ARCA); Positive Personal Profile; PATH (Planning Alternative Tomorrows with Hope); Person-Centered Assessment tool; Vocational Assessment Profiles … or discovery component, meaning that individuals with developmental disabilities experience community activities as a component of the assessment process.

Free Career Test Online – CareerFitter.com

60 question free career test uncovers the scientific summary of your work personality. Generates a detailed full version option with lists of careers and jobs plus.

Mechanical: working with tools and equipment. Communication: listening, speaking and working with others. Judgment: making clear, decisive decisions. Attention: focus on the problem at hand. Thinking: working with new ideas and creative thinking. Physical: strength, agility and dexterity. Senses: eyesight and hearing …